The bias problem with artificial intelligence

Code on a screen.
Artificial intelligence is a booming industry that is creeping into more aspects of our daily lives. But can computers discriminate? As advanced technology tries to make our lives easier, it can also cause a lot of harm. At 11 a.m. Monday, MPR’s Chris Farrell hosts a conversation about AI ethics.
Markus Spiske via Pexels file

Artificial intelligence is creeping into more aspects of our daily lives.

It can recommend the next movie to stream on Netflix or new music to discover on Spotify. It can also remind you to follow-up on ignored emails and suggest responses.

As advanced technology tries to make our lives easier, it can also cause a lot of harm.

For example, Stanford Health Care used an algorithm to decide which employees would receive the coronavirus vaccine first. The algorithm prioritized age rather than exposure to the virus, and Stanford officials later apologized for leaving people out.

How do we deal with biases, and what can be done to avoid them?

Guests:

  • Rumman Chowdhury is a data scientist who is the former head of responsible AI at Accenture Applied Intelligence and has now launched her own company called Parity.

  • Drew Harwell is a reporter at The Washington Post covering artificial intelligence.

Use the audio player above to listen to the program.

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